Home » Herbalism » Bath and Beauty » Pine needle oil for winter wellness

Pine needle oil for winter wellness

This post may contain affiliate links. Read my disclosure policy.

This powerful pine needle oil made of foraged pine needles and warming spices makes an excellent skin care oil that will enhance your skin, hair and warm you up during cold winter.

pine needle oil uses

One of the activities that I enjoy doing during cold months is winter foraging, in particular, collecting pine needles to make my own pine needle oil. You can use other evergreen conifers too to make this lovely winter oil. Instead of throwing your Christmas tree, use its needles to make this warming and comforting pine needle oil to pamper yourself.

Edible pine needles

Pine trees from the Pinaceae family are edible and easy to find all year long. The best way to identify pine trees is to look at their needles. Pine needles occur in clusters of 2- 5 that are called fascicles and are known for their strong aroma. Meanwhile, fir or spruce needles are attached to the branch rather than a cluster.

When you go foraging for pine needles search for a local species and research them to avoid harvesting any yew (Taxus spp.), whose needles are poisonous. If you are a beginner or interested in safe foraging this online foraging course from Grow Forage Cook Ferment is an excellent source.

If you feel inspired by trees, here are my favorite trees captions and quotes.

Pine needle benefits

Pine needles are a wonderful source of vitamin C and nutrients (1). We use them in the kitchen in a form of tea or syrup or like to add them to other sweet or savory dishes for a spicy kick.

Externally pine shoots are powerful antioxidants that can help to reverse damaged skin and premature aging. Astringent properties of pine needles help to reduce pore size and are often used in salves or oils.  I used its power in this warming brown sugar scrub.

Pine needles are also used for hair treatment in the rinse to help with dandruff or making hair shiny.

pine oil recipe

This pine infused oil is enhanced with warming herbs and spices to warm you up during cold winter.

Warming herbs and spices

Incorporating warming herbs and spices into our daily routine is an excellent way to increase circulation and warm up during the winter months. 

These warming herbs and spices include cinnamon, cardamon, ginger, clove, nutmeg, black pepper. Ginger in addition has an anti-inflammatory action that may help to ease ache and pain.  

How to make pine needle oil

First step

When you manage to collect a few branches of pine needles let them sit for one day to dry off the moisture that might be on a surface. Don’t collect needles that already fall down on the ground as they won’t have a strong aroma anymore and more likely develop mold. 

Second step

Use scissors to cut the needles into smaller pieces or mortar and pestle to gently bruise them

cutting pine needles

Third step

Add other spices such as cinnamon stick, clove or ginger. It is optional but gives additional properties and a warming effect to the oil.

warming herbs for winter wellness

Fourth step

Pour extra virgin olive oil or almond oil into a large-mouth glass jar. Make sure you covered all herbs completely.
Use a clean chopstick to mix all the herbs thoroughly removing all remaining air bubbles.

pouring olive oil to make pine oil

Fifth step

Place wax paper between the top of the jar and a lid and seal it.

Sixth step

A) Slow infusion method

Place the jar in a dry and warm spot out of sunlight and let it sit in the dark for over a month (4-6 weeks)

Strain the oil with a strainer or funnel with a cheesecloth into a sterile jar get clear pine oil . Label the jar and store in a cool and dark place

B) Quick infusion with a double boiler

If you are in a hurry, have other projects in mind that you want to make with the pine oil soon you can faster the infusion with double boiler.

DIY Pine Needle Body Oil

Set an open jar with oil and herbaceous substances in a saucepan filled with couple of inches of water. I like to use a steam sieve (as per the picture) to place a jar on (You can also use the jar lids to protect the base instead). 

Heat on very low heat that will not exceed 40 C (110 F) for 5-6 hours.

Refill the water if it evaporates.

Remove the jar from a saucepan and allow it to cool down

Seventh step

Strain in with cheesecloth, label and store in a cool and dry place.

infusing oil from pine needles and other spices

Pine oil uses

Warming oil

Staying warm during the cold winter months helps us remain balanced. We naturally enjoy places like being near a fireplace or cup of hot mulled wine, tea or bowl of warm soup. This pine oil helps to warm up and increase blood circulation.

Massaging oil

It is great for a massage. I like to rub it around my ears down the back of my neck. It also works for foot massage.

how to make pine needle oil

Soothing & moisturizing

Winter can be incredibly drying. Artificial heat, cold and low humidity those are the factors that contribute to dry skin. No wonder that our hands or lips are cracked and chapped. The pine oil in the form of salve, cream, or lip balm soothes our skin and keep it moisturized.

Sore muscles relief

Pine oil encourages blood flow and helps heal achy muscles or rheumatic pain. Add few drops of oil to the bath or massage affected areas with the pine oil

Chest rub

Add few drops of eucalyptus essential oil into a 1 spoon of pine oil and rub it on your chest for relief

Adstringent

Pine oil adstringent properties are often used in salves to prevent aging and reduce pore size

pine oil uses

Pine needle oil for hair

Winter also contributes to your hair and nails to be brittle and thin. Apply 6 drops of essential pine oil into 1 tablespoon of pine infused oil and apply to the thinning spot twice a day. Repeat the process for at least 4 weeks to see results

Beard care

Pine oil medicinal properties are also valued in a beard balm, like in this rosemary pine beard balm!

Aromatherapy

Few drops of pine oil rubbed on your wrist or temples gain some aromatherapy benefits.

Is pine oil toxic?

Don’t be confused with pine essential oil. What we have been making here is a pine infused oil which is very diluted alternative to pine essential oil and is not toxic. However Pine essential oil is obtained by the steam distillation of pine needles from a variety of species of pine, It contains a large amount of turpentine. This pine essential oil is often used in aromatherapy or as a disinfectant. According to Wikipedia, it has a low human toxicity level, however, it can irritate the skin and mucous membranes and has been known to cause breathing problems.

pine oil for skin and hair
Yield: 500 ml (16 ounces)

Pine needle oil for winter wellness

pine needle oil for winter wellness

This powerful pine needle oil made of foraged pine needles and warming spices makes an excellent skincare oil that will enhance your skin, hair and warm you up during cold winter.

Prep Time 20 minutes
Active Time 20 minutes
Additional Time 28 days
Total Time 28 days 40 minutes
Difficulty Easy

Instructions

  1. Use scissors to cut the needles into smaller pieces
  2. Add other spices such as cinnamon stick, clove or ginger. It is optional but gives additional properties and a warming effect to the oil.
  3. Pour extra virgin olive oil or almond oil into a large-mouth glass jar. Make sure that all herbs are covered completely.
  4. Use a clean chopstick to mix all the herbs thoroughly removing all remaining air bubbles.
  5. Place wax paper between the top of the jar and a lid and seal it.
  6. Slow infusion method
  7. Place the jar in a dry and warm spot out of sunlight and let it sit in the dark for over a month (4-6 weeks)
  8. Strain the oil with a strainer or funnel with a cheesecloth into a sterile jar to get clear pine oil.
  9. Label the jar and store it in a cool and dark place 

Notes

Check the post for a faster method with double boiler

Recommended Products

As an Amazon Associate and member of other affiliate programs, I earn from qualifying purchases.

Did you make this project?

Please leave a comment on the blog or share a photo on Instagram

Collection of infusion oils you might want to try

Collection of infusion oils you might want to try

Vladka Merva on January 24th, 2021

5 Comments on “Pine needle oil for winter wellness”

  1. Wow. I appreciate this informative piece. I will save and study it, as this is exactly what I’ve wanted to learn. Thank you for such a helpful article.

    Reply
  2. Hi! Would this oil be safe for children and babies? I’d like to make an infused oil for salves to use as a chest rub when the kids are sick.

    Reply

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Skip to Instructions