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Pickled mustard seeds and 15 ways to use them.

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These pickled mustard seeds are a delicious homemade condiment packed with flavor and texture that level up your sandwiches, dressings, dips, or charcuterie board. They make an excellent garnish for salads, cheese, deviled eggs, or crackers

I enjoy the tangy and unique flavors that pickled and fermented food bring to my meals. They add a delightful crunch and a burst of flavor that enhances my plate. Additionally, regularly consuming these foods helps maintain a healthy digestive system. Fermented cauliflower, bananas or garlic are among my favorite recipes that I enjoy all year round. Moreover, I have experimented with pickled dandelion buds, which are fantastic, although their availability is limited.

Thankfully, these mustard seeds are available throughout the year, allowing me to enjoy this preservation method consistently.

Pickled Mustard Seed Recipe

What Are Pickled Mustard Seeds, and why are they called mustard caviar?

Pickled mustard seeds are a delicious condiment made by soaking whole mustard seeds in vinegar. The brine helps develop a unique crunchy texture while enhancing its natural flavors with a spicy kick.

Pickled mustard seeds are often called “mustard caviar” because they become plump when cooked, giving a popping sensation similar to eating caviar. If you use brown or black mustard seeds, they also look like fish eggs and have a tasty umami flavor, texture, and crunch, just like caviar.

Here are a few tips to make pickled mustard seeds

While making pickled mustard seeds is easy, one chemical reaction is important to clarify because it affects the final taste of pickled mustard seeds.

Blanching the seeds

Cold water effect

Mustard seeds contain a chemical compound called myrosinase, which is responsible for their pungent and zingy flavor. Soaking mustard seeds in cold water can activate myrosinase, releasing pungent and spicy flavors.

However, if you’re aiming for a milder flavor, use warm water or warm liquids, as the higher temperature can slow down the enzymatic reaction and result in milder, less spicy mustard seeds.

What Are Pickled Mustard Seeds

Selection of mustard seeds

In addition, lighter seeds mean a milder taste, while darker seeds mean a hotter, more bitter flavor.

Bitterness

Mustard seeds are the small seeds of the mustard plant that have a naturally bitter taste. If the pickled mustard seeds turn out too bitter for your liking, you can blanche the seeds before soaking them in a brine. 

To reduce the bitterness in mustard seeds, you can blanche the seeds before soaking them in a brine. Blanching involves briefly boiling the seeds and then cooling them in ice water. This process helps to mellow the bitterness of the seeds. 

Additionally, adjusting the sweetness with honey or sugar helps balance the flavors.

why are they called mustard caviar?

Homemade pickled mustard seeds Ingredients

  • Mustard seeds come in three varieties. Yellow Mustard Seeds are the mildest and least spicy among the three varieties. Brown Mustard Seeds offer a medium level of spiciness and are commonly used in making Dijon mustard. Brown mustard seeds can add a bolder flavor to pickled mustard seeds. In contrast, Black Mustard Seeds are the most aromatic and spiciest varieties often used in Indian cuisine. I use brown seeds variety, but yellow seeds are also great for this recipe.
  • Rice vinegar is often used in Asian cuisine, but I like its mild and slightly sweet flavor. Feel free to substitute for white wine vinegar, red wine vinegar, or champagne vinegar.
  • Apple cider vinegar is a tangy vinegar that adds a distinct fruity taste to the pickled mustard seeds.
  • Brown sugar or fermented honey to balance the flavor; it is always good to add a touch of sweetness. You can also use granulated sugar or maple syrup.
  • Ginger, I used a 1-inch, adding a warm and slightly spicy kick of heat. 
  • A whole rosemary sprig adds an extra pine-like essence.
  • Salt to season
Ingredients to make pickled mustard seeds

Pickled Mustard Seed Recipe

I have been using brown mustard seeds for this recipe and aim for pickled mustard seeds’ milder, mellow flavor. Thus, I do a long slow cook. However, for a spicy version, cover it with cold water instead. To remove the bitter tannins, I will be blanching the seeds.

First step – Blanching the seeds

Start by pouring one cup of water into a small saucepan and bringing it to a boil. Once the water is boiling, add the mustard seeds, gently stirring them to ensure they are fully submerged. Allow the seeds to boil in the water for 1 minute. Then, strain through a fine mesh strainer and rinse them thoroughly under cold running water. Next, return the seeds to the saucepan and repeat this process three times. This will help soften the seeds and eliminate their bitterness.

Blanching the seeds
Strain and transfer the mustard seeds into a brine.

Second step – Prepare the brine

Combine rice vinegar, apple cider vinegar, brown sugar, one piece of ginger, and one rosemary strip, and salt in a small pot, and stir to combine and dissolve all ingredients. 

making brine

The third step – Strain and transfer the mustard seeds into a brine.

Add the drained mustard seeds to the pot with the brine and stir to ensure they are coated evenly. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to low and simmer gently for approximately 10-15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Continue simmering until the seeds become tender and plump. Over time, as most of the brine evaporates, the seeds are gelatinous. To prevent fast evaporation, you can cover the saucepan with a lid. If the seeds have absorbed all of the liquid splashes of vinegar or water, remedy this.

Fourth step: Transfer to a jar

Remove from the heat and allow to cool to room temperature. Remove rosemary sprig and ginger and transfer to a clean jar or to a sealable airtight container and kept refrigerated. It will stay fresh in the fridge for several months.

a few tips to make pickled mustard seeds 

How Long can I use Pickled Mustard Seeds?

Pickled mustard seeds can stay good in the fridge for a few months. Then, if they start to dry out or become too thick because they absorb the liquid, add a little more vinegar and stir it in to keep them moist.

15 ways to use this condiment in your everyday cooking

  1. Add a bit to your favorite sandwiches for an extra tangy and flavorful kick.
  2. Sprinkle them over salads to add texture, acidity, and a pop of flavor.
  3. Use them as a condiment on a breakfast charcuterie board or cheese platter.
  4. Enhance the taste of your burgers by adding pickled mustard seeds as a condiment alongside other toppings.
  5. Toss roasted vegetables with them to add a burst of flavor.
  6. Top Tangy Deviled Eggs with a few pickled mustard seeds for a tangy and visually appealing garnish.
  7. Sprinkle them over grain or Buddha bowls.
  8. Blend pickled mustard seeds into your homemade salad dressings for an extra zing and depth of flavor.
  9. Enjoy mustard seeds as a topping for Ground Beef taco bowl.
  10. Serve them alongside seafood dishes like grilled fish or shrimp for a flavorful contrast.
  11. Add pickled mustard seeds to stir-fries to infuse them with a tangy and complex flavor.
  12. Sprinkle pickled mustard seeds over the pizza for a surprising twist and an additional layer of flavor.
  13. Place the mustard seeds into sushi rolls for a burst of tanginess and texture.
  14. Swirl them into your favorite dips.
  15. Use them to replace mustard in hot dogs or grilled meat.
15 ways to use this condiment in your everyday cooking
Yield: 6

Pickled mustard seeds and 15 ways to use them.

Homemade pickled mustard seeds Ingredients

These pickled mustard seeds are a delicious homemade condiment packed with flavor and texture that level up your sandwiches, dressings, dips, or charcuterie board. They make an excellent garnish for salads, cheese, deviled eggs, or crackers. 

Cook Time 40 minutes
Total Time 40 minutes

Ingredients

  • 100 g (1/2 cup) mustard seeds
  • 1/4 cup rice vinegar
  • 1/2 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar or honey
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 inch of garlic
  • 1 rosemary sprig

Instructions

  1. Start by pouring one cup of water into a small saucepan and bringing it to a boil. Once the water is boiling, add the mustard seeds, gently stirring them to ensure they are fully submerged. Allow the seeds to boil in the water for 1 minute. Then, strain through a fine mesh strainer and rinse them thoroughly under cold running water. Next, return the seeds to the saucepan and repeat this process three times. This will help soften the seeds and eliminate their bitterness.
  2. Combine rice vinegar, apple cider vinegar, brown sugar, one piece of ginger, and one rosemary strip, and salt in a small pot, and stir to combine and dissolve all ingredients. 
  3. Add the drained mustard seeds to the pot with the brine and stir to ensure they are coated evenly. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to low and simmer gently for approximately 10-15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Continue simmering until the seeds become tender and plump. Over time, as most of the brine evaporates, the seeds are gelatinous. To prevent fast evaporation, you can cover the saucepan with a lid. If the seeds have absorbed all of the liquid splashes of vinegar or water, remedy this.
  4. Remove from the heat and allow to cool to room temperature. Remove rosemary sprig and ginger and transfer to a clean jar or to a sealable airtight container and kept refrigerated. It will stay fresh in the fridge for several months.

Nutrition Information:

Yield:

6

Serving Size:

1

Amount Per Serving: Calories: 47Total Fat: 0gSaturated Fat: 0gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 0gCholesterol: 0mgSodium: 180mgCarbohydrates: 11gFiber: 0gSugar: 10gProtein: 0g

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Vladka Merva on May 31st, 2023

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